Education

A Lesson Learned From Our Commander in Chief: Petty Isn’t Pretty

Let's spin Trump's behavior in to a life lesson on conflict resolution.

Like most Americans, I have been desperately trying to find a silver lining in our country’s current political climate since last November. After about eight months of unsuccessful reflection, I’ve realized that as Americans, we need to create our own silver lining. It’s true, in life you have two options. You can sit wallow in your sorrows, or you can try to find a life lesson or solution in the face of hardship. I am choosing to pursue the latter route, and I encourage you to join me.

There are important lessons to be learned through our president’s actions. Not in a “monkey see, monkey do” sense, but rather in a “monkey see, monkey do the opposite” manner. One of the first lessons Trump has shown us is in his presidency is—*drumroll*—petty isn’t pretty.

We’ve all felt betrayal or disappointment in some capacity, and the temptation to do be petty that follows that. However, most people past their childhood understand that there is grace that lies within a patient reaction.

Unfortunately for the USA, Trump has yet to learn this lesson, and at this point, it seems too far gone. His quick reactions and snarky attacks on Twitter when someone crosses him or when actual truths are exposed against his will (what he deems “#FakeNews”).

Exhibit A

I’m sure you haven’t forgotten his sexist attack on Morning Joe host Mika Brzezinski back in June:

His petty Twitter rebuttals are cyberbullying in its purest form, and I would be remiss to not point out that they essentially undermine the FLOTUS’s anti-cyberbullying mission.

Mrs. Trump cares deeply about issues impacting women and children, and she has focused her platform as First Lady on the problem of cyber bullying among our youth. –The White House

No well-mannered person looked at these tweets and thought they were constructive. In the weeks after the rant, people continued to only talk about the obscenity of his actions, not the bias of the reporters.

The Life Lesson

What Trump fails to realize is that reactions like these do not validate your cause, but rather discredit your character. Publicly defaming a foe or attempting to slander someone who has a difference in opinion is not the way to rise above conflict. Remember: the loudest reaction doesn’t win, and being the bigger person results in a bigger, constructive impact. After all, petty isn’t pretty!